The Physical Demands of Football (Soccer) – Part II

After discussing the energy system demands of football and how to condition for the game in Part I, I will now focus on the motor system demands.

Just to be clear, when I talk about motor system demands, I’m talking about everything that is controlled by the motor cortex and associated areas in the brain. I’m well aware that the only true motor quality is strength, and that without sensory information, such as proprioception, this would be an uncoordinated mess, but for simplicity’s sake I will group everything from strength and agility to balance under the heading of motor system demands.

Strength is the foundation of every other motor quality. Charles Staley has likened เว็บไม่ผ่านเอย่นต์ ufabet  maximal strength to the top rung of a ladder, where if you improve it, all the other motor qualities below it are improved as well.

Footballers are traditionally notorious for shying away from the weight room. Whilst this may have changed at the high end of the game, many recreational players still avoid the iron for a myriad of (mythological) reasons ranging from tradition to fear of becoming ‘muscle bound’ and immobile.

It is now common knowledge that such claims are ludicrous, and that strength training should be part of every athlete’s regime.

Footballer players should focus on increasing strength in the big lifts, in decreasing order of importance: squats, pulls (O-lift variations, rows and chins) and presses. There isn’t much demand in the game to move external loads, so loading so progress from bodyweight, to weighted vest and finally to barbell. This progression will teach the body to become more efficient at moving, which is one of the goals of strength training.

A sample, and very basic program could look like:

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